wolffe: (ga state parks)
From a program held at today's Panola Mountain State Park volunteer tree planting.


Harris Hawk

a few more )
wolffe: (Default)
From a program held at today's Panola Mountain State Park volunteer tree planting.


Harris Hawk

a few more )
wolffe: (peach nehi)
After spending yesterday taking pictures of our campground volunteers during their annual conference, I started the day getting a few test shots of the area where I would later take a group photo.



cut because I love you. )
wolffe: (Default)
After spending yesterday taking pictures of our campground volunteers during their annual conference, I started the day getting a few test shots of the area where I would later take a group photo.



cut because I love you. )
wolffe: (ga state parks)
I went to Ft. Yargo State Park to photograph a camping club who graciously allowed us to come and take pictures for our various marketing efforts.


They cooked enough food to feed an army. I was able to resist everything except the grilled corn. Yum!
3 more )
wolffe: (Default)
I went to Ft. Yargo State Park to photograph a camping club who graciously allowed us to come and take pictures for our various marketing efforts.


They cooked enough food to feed an army. I was able to resist everything except the grilled corn. Yum!
3 more )
wolffe: (adventure)
I've never been afraid of wild animals, or really animals in general. At times, it's given my parents healthy adrenaline rushes, such as when they found me calmly flitting from one side of a rather large horse to the other using the under the belly route. I was six at the time, so it seemed like a reasonable way to work my way around the horse. Lucky for me, said horse was a calm, forgiving sort of fellow.

Although I've not been afraid of animals, I do have a healthy respect for sharp, pointy or poisonous bits. I have the common sense not to pick up a rattlesnake, for instance, but I have to admit to shooing a few off a dirt road if I find them in a particularly compromising (read: gonna get run over) position.

Which is all to say it wasn't anything out of character for me to be the first around the corner when a coworker started yelling for a box interjected with noises of distress. We were in a break from a meeting at one of the historic sites, and she was headed to the bathroom but never made it. So I rounded the corner into the hallway and there's my coworker, arms akimbo and pointing at a furry lump on the floor.

I thought it was a mouse. I bent down to see if the little guy was dead and realized it wasn't a mouse at all. It was a perfectly adorable, teeny brown bat. I thought it was dead so I just went to pick it up but he surprised me by moving his head. So I gently scooped my fingers under his little body and gave a gentle tug.

Nothing doing. He was underneath the sill of a door that stays locked and behind a plant. We wondered how he'd gotten underneath the sill, and as I gave another little tug the coworker started fluttering that I was going to rip his legs off. I wiggled him back and forth a bit and saw one teeny clawed leg pop out from under before shooting back out of sight. Little bugger was holding on. I harrumphed and rocked him a bit more, then tugged a bit. He have up the fight and two little legs popped out from under the sill and grabbed onto my pinky finger, which I had positioned just for that purpose.

So now I have a teeny brown bat clutching my pinky and resting his head on my index finger. I stand up only to have a box shoved under my arm. I told the coworker that even if I could extract the little guy from my hand, it just wasn't that good of an idea to let a flying mammal ride unrestrained in a box to the outdoors.

By this time we had a nice crowd going and they exchanged worries about me getting bitten and contracting rabies. As if he could hear what they were saying, little guy opens wide and shows off a surprising number of rather pointy little teeth. The box was shoved at me again.

I just put him next to my body and cooed, telling him that my goodness he was having a rough day and wasn't it rude of us to interrupt what was obviously a perfectly good nap. I was rewarded by a lazy stretch of wings and a careful repositioning of a teeny body ending with a quite comfortable bat hugging my hand with his little wing fingers.

The whole procession - me, the bat and about 5 coworkers - made it outside where we scanned the woods for a suitable place for him to wait out the day. I found a nice tree with a forked limb that would protect him from the wind and hide him from any predators, both in the sky and on the ground.

Convincing him that the tree was a better option than my hand took some doing, but eventually he went feet first into the little space and curled his wings under him. One of the coworkers gave him a blanket of leaves and pine straw and we left him peeking out at us with little black eyes.

I was commended on my bat rescuing skills and decided I should start adding bullet points to my resume. Kenzie, Bat Handler, has a nice ring.
wolffe: (Default)
I've never been afraid of wild animals, or really animals in general. At times, it's given my parents healthy adrenaline rushes, such as when they found me calmly flitting from one side of a rather large horse to the other using the under the belly route. I was six at the time, so it seemed like a reasonable way to work my way around the horse. Lucky for me, said horse was a calm, forgiving sort of fellow.

Although I've not been afraid of animals, I do have a healthy respect for sharp, pointy or poisonous bits. I have the common sense not to pick up a rattlesnake, for instance, but I have to admit to shooing a few off a dirt road if I find them in a particularly compromising (read: gonna get run over) position.

Which is all to say it wasn't anything out of character for me to be the first around the corner when a coworker started yelling for a box interjected with noises of distress. We were in a break from a meeting at one of the historic sites, and she was headed to the bathroom but never made it. So I rounded the corner into the hallway and there's my coworker, arms akimbo and pointing at a furry lump on the floor.

I thought it was a mouse. I bent down to see if the little guy was dead and realized it wasn't a mouse at all. It was a perfectly adorable, teeny brown bat. I thought it was dead so I just went to pick it up but he surprised me by moving his head. So I gently scooped my fingers under his little body and gave a gentle tug.

Nothing doing. He was underneath the sill of a door that stays locked and behind a plant. We wondered how he'd gotten underneath the sill, and as I gave another little tug the coworker started fluttering that I was going to rip his legs off. I wiggled him back and forth a bit and saw one teeny clawed leg pop out from under before shooting back out of sight. Little bugger was holding on. I harrumphed and rocked him a bit more, then tugged a bit. He have up the fight and two little legs popped out from under the sill and grabbed onto my pinky finger, which I had positioned just for that purpose.

So now I have a teeny brown bat clutching my pinky and resting his head on my index finger. I stand up only to have a box shoved under my arm. I told the coworker that even if I could extract the little guy from my hand, it just wasn't that good of an idea to let a flying mammal ride unrestrained in a box to the outdoors.

By this time we had a nice crowd going and they exchanged worries about me getting bitten and contracting rabies. As if he could hear what they were saying, little guy opens wide and shows off a surprising number of rather pointy little teeth. The box was shoved at me again.

I just put him next to my body and cooed, telling him that my goodness he was having a rough day and wasn't it rude of us to interrupt what was obviously a perfectly good nap. I was rewarded by a lazy stretch of wings and a careful repositioning of a teeny body ending with a quite comfortable bat hugging my hand with his little wing fingers.

The whole procession - me, the bat and about 5 coworkers - made it outside where we scanned the woods for a suitable place for him to wait out the day. I found a nice tree with a forked limb that would protect him from the wind and hide him from any predators, both in the sky and on the ground.

Convincing him that the tree was a better option than my hand took some doing, but eventually he went feet first into the little space and curled his wings under him. One of the coworkers gave him a blanket of leaves and pine straw and we left him peeking out at us with little black eyes.

I was commended on my bat rescuing skills and decided I should start adding bullet points to my resume. Kenzie, Bat Handler, has a nice ring.

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